Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #138 – Natural Light

Some of the most beautiful buildings are those that can harness natural light and bring it inside, giving the illusion of being outdoors. Churches in particular are good at this, often being tall buildings with lots of windows. La Sagrada Familia in Barcelona makes you feel as if you are walking in a forest, with the light filtering down through the trees.

St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican, though done in a completely different style, is also amazing in this respect. The windows up high in the famous dome let heavenly rays of light come shining down.

Of course, natural light is part of what makes landscapes so compelling. In Ireland, the light is always changing as the clouds move, sometimes intense and sometimes soft. It’s part of what makes the “forty shades of green!”

How many shades can you see?

Lens-Artists Challenge #135: Glimpse into your world.

The world outside my window is very snowy right now, but one of the things I love about Ohio is its variability. I love that we get four true seasons every year, and I appreciate each one! My appreciation of winter is growing limited at the moment, but I know it won’t last forever.

My inner world is even more complex and crazy. I am an introvert, a storyteller, a scientist, a dreamer, and most of all a nerd. Here are some of the things I’ve shared on this blog that give you a glimpse into my headspace.

Lens-Artists Challenge #134 – From Forgettable to Favorite

Most photos I take with my phone, so I often quickly touch them up with Google Photos editing and maybe a little cropping. If I’m making a scrapbook with them, though, I usually put them through Historian, a photo editing software designed for scrapbookers.

Most of the time, I like authenticity in my photos. The Sagrada Família in Barcelona has been under construction since 1882, and won’t be completed until 2026 or so. (Construction had to be halted briefly last year due to the pandemic, and who knows how it will continue to affect progress). So when I visited in 2012, all the pictures we took had large cranes and other construction equipment in them. While I wanted to document the historical progress of the basilica with my photos, I also gave into temptation and edited the cranes out in one photo!

So instead of a slightly tilted, overly busy image of the facade of the church, now I have a beautiful photo that allows one to focus on the fantastic details that Gaudí designed.