Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #68: Layered

Some of the most impressive Roman ruins I’ve seen were actually in Spain, or Hispania as it was known then. In fact, this one hardly counts as a ruin, considering that it has been restored at various times over the years and was used for its intended purpose until the mid-19th century. This aqueduct, built around the 1st century AD, is one of the symbols of Segovia, Spain. Seen here in 2006, it has two beautiful layers of arches, one large on the bottom and one smaller on top.

You can see the layers of unmortared bricks in this closer shot. The niche holds a statue of the Virgin Mary, which the Internet tells me may be la Virgen de la Fuencisla, the patron saint of Segovia.

You can find more layers filled at the original Lens-Artist challenge.

You can also check out some layers of cliff-nesting seabirds from a previous WPC: Layered.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Layered

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From Skellig Michael.

The cliff edges on the island of Skellig Michael are impressive layers of rock.  But look a little more closely, and you’ll also see rows upon rows of nesting seabirds, stacked in death-defying layers on tiny rock ledges.  In this picture you can see some guillemots (darker) and fulmars (lighter, look like gulls).

Weekly Photo Challenge: Layered