Free Books from Kellogg’s Feeding Reading

Kellogg’s is running their Feeding Reading program again this summer that allows you to get free books when you purchase certain products like cereals, Cheez-Its, Eggo waffles, Pringles, and Pop-Tarts.  You can get up to 10 free books, from all reading levels from picture and board books to YA titles.

Here’s my first set of free books, all for my toddler:

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We’ve been reading these three at bedtime for the past week, so I think they were a hit.

With the amount of Pop-Tarts and waffles we go through in my house, I’m sure we’ll get the other seven soon.  I like to get some of the YA titles for myself; some of the choices this year include these:

FR YA books

Go check it out and get your free books!

Black Authors I’m Reading Right Now

I’ve seen a lot of media posts about great non-fiction books (mostly from POC authors) regarding racism; you can even just take a look at the recent New York Times bestsellers list:

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This is unquestionably important, and I myself have been trying to learn to be a better ally. However, I typically focus on fiction here, so I’d like to highlight some ways I’m diversifying my reading list with novels featuring black authors and/or main characters, which use fiction to address racial topics either directly or in more indirect ways.

Ta-Nehisi Coates

The Water Dancer

43982054I was introduced to Coates through his nonfiction (essays for The Atlantic and memoirs), and his beautiful writing quickly made him a must-read author for me.  I was so excited to pick up his first fiction novel, The Water Dancer, a historical fantasy story about a young Virginian slave who seeks to use his curious power to free himself and others.  I have only just started it, but the beginning is very interesting, starting in medias res and then giving some more of Hiram’s backstory.  I think Coates’ lyrical prose works well with the magical realism content.

Though it is in a historical context, this book addresses racial issues pretty directly.  Hiram is in an interesting position in that his mother is enslaved but his father is the white plantation owner; he himself becomes a house slave and so has some insight into both worlds and therefore possibly feels the injustice of his position between them even more keenly.  I am interested to see where this one goes.

Jason Reynolds

Ghost

28954126I was introduced to Jason Reynolds when his middle grade novel Ghost made the Great American Read’s top 100 list of best-loved books.  I’ve since heard him speak on TV several times and have really been impressed by him.  Ghost is a really charming book that should be standard curriculum for middle schools.

It follows Castle Cranshaw, aka Ghost, a naturally talented runner whose main goals in life are to be a basketball player and avoid trouble.  Well, Ghost doesn’t really manage either of those, but he does manage to join a competitive track team, which starts to bring some changes to his life.  I loved reading Ghost’s perspective; the strength of his personality really pulled me in and kept me rooting for him.  I’m looking forward to reading the stories of the other diverse members of the track team in this series, as well as Reynolds’ other books, including a young reader remix of Stamped in collaboration with Ibram X. Kendi.

Ibi Zoboi

Pride

35068632. sy475 I seldom turn down a Pride and Prejudice retelling, considering that Austen’s original is one of my favorite books of all time.  I was pleasantly surprised with this one, which works well both as modern slice-of-life story in NYC and as a P&P remix. Pride follows Zuri Benitez, a Bushwick native who has a lot on her mind: her neighborhood is changing, her sisters are a little crazy, and she really, really wants to get into Howard.  She does not have time for the cute rich boy that just moved in across the street.

I loved how I could really feel Zuri’s Haitian-Dominican culture coming through the pages.   This story echoes P&P by focusing on class differences between the main characters.  It kind of highlights the concept that there isn’t really just one black experience; different black people can experience their race and culture differently.  And although P&P was the hook that got me interested in the story, I actually think it was stronger when it moved away from the P&P plot points.

Are you guys making any efforts to consciously diversify your reading lists?  I’ve only mentioned black authors here, but I’m generally trying to read more POC authors and characters across all genres.  It’s helping to broaden my horizons and I’m finding some really great stories, too.

 

Review: Rebel by Marie Lu

I very much enjoyed Marie Lu’s Legend trilogy when I read it six years ago, mainly on the strength of the two excellent main characters, June and Day.  I am not a huge fan of dystopian novels, but this series stood out to me in the sea of YA dystopias.

42121526So I was very pleasantly surprised to see a new installment in the series, Rebel, which takes places 10 years later following Day (now going by Daniel) and his brother Eden’s adventures in their new home of Antarctica.  But this one turned out to be a mixed bag for me, and I’m not sure I would recommend it unless you are already a fan of Legend.

Eden and his friend Pressa are at the heart of the story; they are the new generation of the post-war era, and in many ways like a new version of June and Day.  Eden is part of the “establishment” (the upper levels of Antarctica) as June was, and Pressa comes from the Undercity similar to how Day came from the streets.  However, I never found them as compelling as June and Day.  If Pressa had some chapters from her perspective, I think she would have felt like a more fully-realized character.

I also missed June’s perspective, though I enjoyed the chapters from Daniel.  It is a very satisfying story for June/Day shippers like myself.  The development of the relationship between the brothers Daniel and Eden was also really nicely done, and that bond was something that I never realized was missing from a lot of the books I read.  Plus, I also liked the villain, Dominic Hann, who really ends up being more of a grey character.

Antarctica is a very interesting place, governed by a system that works like a video game.  Doing “good” things gets you points that allow you to level up, getting more privileges in society, while doing “bad” things decreases your level.  However, I wish the story would have shown more of the flaws in the system rather than telling.  The scene with Eden’s classmates works towards this a bit, but we don’t really get to see from the undercity perspective at all.  What is it that is really keeping the undercity people from moving up in this supposedly merit-based system?  For example, we don’t find out until ¾ of the way through the book that it’s illegal for groups of citizens to protest in public, after the people are already doing this.

I was pretty harsh on Champion for its biological mumbo jumbo regarding plague cures, and I’m sorry to say Rebel has a bit of a similar problem: for a sci-fi book, it’s not very interested in accurately describing the engineering behind Antarctica’s level system.  When discussing how to reset the Ross City’s level system using Hann’s machine, Eden says:

“It’s the machine that’s complicated to put together. Not the signal. Once you understand how it works, you can run another signal through easily.  I watched them test one, and it took a matter of minutes.”

Huh? I supposed I should ask my husband for accuracy, but this does not sound like something a computer programmer would say, even to a non-programmer.  Is he saying that it is the hardware that is complicated, not the software?  That seems…unlikely.  Sure, it may not take long to upload the code to the computer, but how long did it take to write the code??  The Antarctic level system is a complex system with a lot of rules, all of which would have to be programmed in, including the changes that Eden wants to make.  Eden does it in no time at all, which I can tell you is not realistic, even for someone as talented as Eden. 

Overall, I enjoyed reading Rebel, but I did struggle a bit to finish it because it dragged in places.  I think it would have been better served as a novella.

Review: Sunbolt by Intisar Khanani

I’ve been taking advantage of all this time home to pick up some new books, and my latest find is a YA fantasy series by an indie author living in Ohio.

Intisar Khanani heads her website with the tagline “Writing mighty girls and diverse worlds,” and that’s exactly what she delivers.  I have not read a lot of YA fantasy recently because I’ve been disappointed by the quality of recent releases, but I can tell that’s going to change with the discovery of her Sunbolt series.

I cannot say enough about the amazing worldbuilding in this series.  The world features many diverse fantasy cultures with roots in real-world cultures, which you may recognize by names, foods, clothing, and phrases. (Even if you don’t recognize them, the cultures are rich.) The main character Hitomi is mixed race; based on context clues her parents would be Arabic and Japanese, though she begins the story living on a warm island populated by darker-skinned people. There are also several races of beings similar to things like fairies and vampires.

The series begins with Sunbolt, a novella that is the kind of book you can read in one gulp.  The pacing is great, the characters are memorable, and the events are exciting.  It does read like it’s only the first part of a story, so you will want to be ready to go straight on to Memories of Ash, the full novel that follows.  This installment is even stronger, continuing to develop an interesting system of magic and new regions of the world.  Old friends reappeared in just the right spots, while introducing great new characters that I can’t wait to see more of.  Some details of the escape plan were a bit meandering, but overall I was on the edge of my seat following Hitomi through one adventure after another.

I really have very few criticisms of these books; they are better than many traditionally published YA fantasies I have read, and I will definitely go back to revisit them again.  (This is basically more what I was hoping We Hunt the Flame would be.)  The only tedious parts are that most of the plot revolves around people that keep getting captured and planning how to escape.  

These books also avoid most YA tropes.  There is no instalove. There are no love triangles.  In fact, here is no romance of any kind! It focuses exclusively on the deep relationships Hitomi has developed with those around her, basically her surrogate family members.

This doesn’t mean I’m not shipping characters.  Because I’m totally shipping some characters. But it’s still great to read quality YA without romance!

I guess I do have one criticism of the series: it’s not complete!  The author has said it was meant to be four books in total, but there seems to be no news on when the last two might be out.  I need book three! Pleeeeease.

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In the meantime, I’m going to check out Khanani’s other novel, Thorn, which is a Goose Girl retelling (have I mentioned I love fairy tale retellings?).  Thorn was originally self-published in 2012, but was picked up by HarperTeen and re-released by them this March.  This kind of thing rarely happens to indie authors, so I think that really speaks to the quality of her writing.  I have the digital version on hold at the library, but the wait list is 16 weeks long! I guess that also speaks to the quality of the writing.

I was able to get both Sunbolt and Memories of Ash on Kindle from my library through Overdrive, but they are of course also available from Amazon for only $2.99 and $4.99 respectively.

I really hope you guys will check her stuff out; if you are a fan of YA fantasy, you will not be disappointed.

Quarantine Book Tag

This is like the third or fourth post I’ve done recently with “quarantine” in the title, as well as the second book tag I’ve done in a month.  I don’t usually do book tags so frequently, but it’s been a fun change of pace for me.

This book tag was created on Youtube by Our BookNook and I found it once again on Madame Writer’s blog.  In keeping with the theme of quarantine, today I’m going with only books that I own.

Must-Have – A book you *have* to have with you while quarantined.

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Pride and Prejudice

This is my go-to book for any mood or season; it never fails to entertain.  It was the only paperback I took with me during my study abroad in Spain.  I actually own two copies: the one I read for class in high school, and one that is part of a very large Jane Austen anthology.

Isolation – A book where the MC spends most of their time in the book alone.

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Into the Wild

I had to read this for some class in high school, I don’t even remember why.  It is the true story of a young man who ventured alone into the Alaskan wilderness and eventually died there.  I did not particularly enjoy it; I could not really relate to the main character.  To me it seemed he had some kind of undiagnosed mental illness, rather than being some kind of tragic figure or icon of freedom.

Binge Read – A long book series you’d recommend to someone who has a lot more time on their hands.

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The Dresden Files

This is one of the few series I can think of that just keeps getting better and better as it goes.  There are 15 books, with 2 more on the way soon, plus a lot of short stories.  The first book is decent, but the series starts to hit its stride around book 3 and never looks back.  If you like urban fantasy, complete with wizards, mythical creatures, and detective noir beats all centered in Chicago, this is the series for you.

Toiler Paper – All the TP is gone! What book are you using?

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The Crystal Star

This book is widely considered the worst of the Star Wars Expanded Universe.  I can’t say I enjoyed it; frankly, I can’t say I remember anything at all about it.  I also might pick Barbara Hambly’s Children of the Jedi series, because Callista is my least favorite character in the entire EU (and Daala is in the running, too, for that matter).  The only reason I keep these books now is because I enjoy having a collection of EU books; I realllllly doubt I will ever waste my time re-reading them.

Actually, I would probably just use some of the books on my shelf I haven’t read, because then I wouldn’t even know what I was giving up.  Ignorance is bliss.

Anti-viral – A book that went viral that you have avoided or not read…yet.

I’ve got two books sitting on my shelf that fit for this one.

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Wicked Saints

I picked this one up after I met the author last year; it was a hyped dark fantasy debut.  I read the first page and it didn’t appeal to me.  I’ve been meaning to get back to it, and maybe now is a good time?

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A Brightness Long Ago

This is one I got from my Jolabokaflod book exchange at Christmas.  I was so excited to read it, got through the first chapter, then put it down and never made it back into it (I rarely read physical books nowadays).  I am hoping to get back to it soon, because I love this author.

Super Binge – What book and TV series combo would you recommend?

8855321The Expanse (TV Series 2015– ) - IMDb

The Expanse

This is currently one of my favorite sci-fi series, with a liberal mix of space opera, detective noir, politics, and some thrills thrown in for good measure.  It has a very believable view of the future, with some fascinating science and technology.  The TV series is one of my favorite book adaptations; the cast is stellar (no pun intended) and the effects are great.  They have changed a few things, but they’ve remained faithful to the books and changed things in a way that works better for a TV series.