Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #68: Layered

Some of the most impressive Roman ruins I’ve seen were actually in Spain, or Hispania as it was known then.  In fact, this one hardly counts as a ruin, considering that it has been restored at various times over the years and was used for its intended purpose until the mid-19th century.  This aqueduct, built around the 1st century AD, is one of the symbols of Segovia, Spain.  Seen here in 2006, it has two beautiful layers of arches, one large on the bottom and one smaller on top.

You can see the layers of unmortared bricks in this closer shot.  The niche holds a statue of the Virgin Mary, which the Internet tells me may be la Virgen de la Fuencisla, the patron saint of Segovia.

You can find more layers filled at the original Lens-Artist challenge.

You can also check out some layers of cliff-nesting seabirds from a previous WPC: Layered.

6 thoughts on “Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #68: Layered

  1. For Tyeth October 21, 2019 / 12:59 pm

    Hello Mei-Mei, once more fantastic photos and the shot of the statue is nice as you could easily miss it just looking at the first picture. The Romans were light years ahead of history regards to water management. They built many magnificent aqua-ducts (there is another similar one in France), created underfloor heating powered by steam (Hydro-course) , and even had drainage systems. Looking forward to your next Lens Challenge.

    Like

  2. Leya October 21, 2019 / 3:41 pm

    More beautiful layers than these are hard to come by…love this aqueduct!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Ally Bean October 22, 2019 / 8:49 am

    Your photos are cool. I like the stone arches, the detail you captured is lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Amy October 22, 2019 / 11:32 am

    Awesome shot! Majestic layers, Mei-Mei!

    Liked by 1 person

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