Feeding Reading — Free Book Haul!

It’s that time of year again…summer means free books from Kellogg’s Feeding Reading program. You technically still have 2 days to buy select Kellogg’s products and submit the receipts to redeem up to ten free books. You can find the details here.

Can you tell we are into Paw Patrol around here?

Frankly, this year I found the system for submitting receipts and ordering books to be pretty frustrating. Here are some tips that I found from navigating my way through.

  1. Submit only one receipt at a time. Once you have one receipt accepted then you can do the next. There is no way to track receipts in the system, so if you submit two and one is rejected you have no way of knowing which it was.
  2. Read carefully the advice for submitting receipts. I had several of mine rejected almost right away and I found what really helped was circling and/or highlighting the relevant products on the receipt.
  3. If you are taking photos of your receipts, crop them to reduce size. You only get 5MB total for one receipt, and most of mine needed three pics to get the whole thing.
  4. In the catalog they used to have separate categories for different age ranges, so I didn’t have to look through all the YA books to find the board books for my toddler. Alas, they are all listed on one page now. There are age ranges listed once you click on a book, but I found it saved some clicking to just open Goodreads or Amazon in another tab and search whatever book I thought looked interesting to see if it was something my kids would like.

However, I was still able to get ten free books for me, my kids, and my nieces so it seems a bit petty to complain. We eat Eggo waffles and Cheez-Its on a daily basis around here so I didn’t even have to buy anything I wasn’t already buying. And they have a great selection of popular books for all ages and interests. I’ve been participating in this program for years and I hope they’ll keep doing it for years to come.

Books Unite Us. Censorship Divides Us.

This week we celebrate Banned Books Week, sponsored by the American Library Association and others to celebrate our freedom to read and bring awareness to challenges of materials in schools, libraries, and bookstores. This past year has seen a huge number of challenges in local school districts; the ALA recorded 729 challenges last year, compared to 156 challenges in 2020 and 377 in 2019 (pre-pandemic).

You may notice some trends in the top ten challenged materials this year: sex and LGBTQ+ content. Nine out of ten books fall into one of these categories. There has been a huge push by conservatives, fueled by social media use, to paint these books as pornographic or grooming or indoctrinating children. You can see this in the language they use in their complaints below: “woke” “indoctrinating” “critical race theory” “Marxist” In school board and library board meetings across the country, people have stood up to read explicit passages (out of context) from books found in school libraries to try to shock the community into having them removed from libraries and class syllabi.

Of course, not every book is appropriate for every child at every point in their development. But I reject the premise that any inclusion of sex, racism, gender dysphoria, etc. is automatically harmful. The context is important as well, and the whole point reading literature in school is to teach children to think critically. For my children, I would rather have them reading and struggling with tough concepts in an age-appropriate way, with the guidance of their teachers and myself, rather than shelter them. Books help expand one’s worldview; it’s not always a pretty picture but sometimes we find something that really resonates with us and helps us grow. Here’s a thoughtful Twitter thread from author Shannon Hale that speaks to this:

Gender Queer by Maia Kobabe has been the subject of much controversy since its release in 2019. It was recently the subject of a lawsuit in Virginia in which two Republicans requested a restraining order against Barnes & Noble to prevent them from selling Gender Queer and A Court of Mist and Fury to minors, claiming they are obscene. A judge recently dismissed the case, ruling that the plaintiffs had failed to establish that either book was obscene and further that “Virginia Code § 18.2-384 is unconstitutional on its face.” However, Virginia Beach City schools did remove all copies of Gender Queer from their libraries. Gender Queer is a 2020 winner of the ALA’s Alex Award and has a 4.35 star rating on Goodreads.

The #2 title, Lawn Boy by Jonathan Evison, was the subject of some local controversy here in Northeast Ohio. After some parents in Hudson, Ohio complained about a prompt in a book used for a college-level course (which involved the mayor threatening the school board with charges of child pornography), one parent went further to complain about Lawn Boy being available in the library, citing inappropriate sexual content. It was eventually returned to shelves after a review. Lawn Boy is a 2019 winner of the ALA’s Alex Award and has a 3.83 rating on Goodreads.

Jumping down a few to #5 is The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas, which is the only book on this list that I have read. And I do not hesitate to say that it is a book all teenagers in America should be reading. It has been nominated for/won more awards than I have room to list and has a 4.5 star rating on Goodreads. It is gripping, compelling, and entertaining while being an educational experience; it deals with justice and morality without being preachy; it is both timely and a classic. Starr is a wonderful protagonist that I would love for all teens to meet.

Fight book banning on a local level

If you’ve made it this far in this post, you have seen how censorship is taking place on a local level, in school districts and city libraries. While I have voted in local elections all my adulthood, this past year has really hammered home to me how critical these elections are. Pay attention to the positions of the candidates for school board in particular. Since my children are not in public schools, I never concerned myself about these elections too much. But now I understand that I want to live in and foster a community that sees diverse literature for young adults as a tool for growth and self-discovery. Vote for library levies and utilize library resources; librarians are the ones on the front lines of the fight for freedom in reading. Practice thoughtful reading in your own home. When I find problematic things in children’s books (typically sexism in older books) for my four-year-old I try to mention them and give my thoughts. As he gets older, I’ll ask more for his thoughts as well.

What are your favorite banned books? How do you celebrate your freedom to read? What are you reading right now?

Previous Banned Books Week posts

Reblog: Saga and the Revolutionary Power of the Opposite of War

A great analysis of one of my favorite graphic novel series, Saga, by one of my favorite bloggers! Enjoy! (NSFW)

Comic books are a vast medium.  Every genre you can imagine can be found between the covers of one comic or another.  While often seen solely as the setting of superhero stories, there are horror comics, memoir comics, true crime comics, comic adaptations of classic literature, fantasy comics, sci-fi comics, comic adaptations of films, YA […]

Saga and the Revolutionary Power of the Opposite of War

A Darkness at the Door cover reveal!

Here’s your first look at the upcoming YA fantasy release from Intisar Khanani, A Darkness at the Door.

This is one of my most anticipated releases this year! A Darkness at the Door is the third book in the Dauntless Path series, a direct sequel to The Theft of Sunlight. Which, may I remind you, ended in a horrrrrrrible cliffhanger! But it was so good I can’t even be mad! I still really need to know what happens next though.

The amazing cover art for all three Dauntless Path books was done by Jenny Zemanek. The final US version of ADatD will also have a special hand-lettered title to match the other covers, courtesy of a stretch goal from the Kickstarter that’s currently running.

I’m so excited to see where’s Rae’s story goes. This series has so much going for it: adventure, social justice, a bit of intrigue, major chemistry, diverse characters, magic, thief lords…


The truth I carry can’t be allowed to die . . .

Only Rae knows how deep the corruption at the heart of her kingdom runs. Imprisoned on a slave ship, she effects a harrowing escape – but her freedom comes with the weight of dangerous debts and terrifying magic. Now, to free her land from the growing darkness, Rae will need every ally she can find, including Bren, the thief who may have stolen her heart. But Bren is hiding his own bloody secrets, and the curses that encircle Rae have sunk their claws into her mind.

While the truth could save Rae’s kingdom, it might destroy her first.

A Darkness at the Door will be released July 21, 2022 by Snowy Wings Publishing in the US and Canada (reserve your copy through the Kickstarter) and Hot Key Books in the UK and beyond (pre-order here).