Camp NaNo Poll: Best place for fanfiction?

This July I am participating in Camp Nano, with the goal of writing for 500 minutes.  I’m doing okay so far with devoting time to writing, but I’ve only written two scenes!  Ugh! I think this is because I didn’t have a strong outline like I usually do, so I’m kind of floundering.  I’m a plotter, not a pantser!

campnanoI’ve started on a new project this month, and surprising to me, I’m back to writing fanfiction!  I used to write a lot of Cardcaptor Sakura and Star Wars fanfics back in high school and college, but I haven’t done any in over 10 years now.

Consequently, I’m kind of out of the loop on where to post fanfiction online.  I used to use fanfiction.net (my stuff is still there), but maybe that’s not as popular anymore?  Of course, I do have this blog as well, but I don’t usually post my writing here, and I’m especially hesitant to post fanfics because of the dubious legalities.

So, fellow writers, what do you think?

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Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #55 – Dreamy

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Ireland has many dreamy locations, particularly on the beautiful western coast.  The day we went to Lough Annascaul in the Dingle Peninsula, the misty weather gave it a dream-like quality.

You can find more dreamy scenes at the original Lens-Artist challenge.  You can also check out some dreamy sea lions from the Galápagos from when the Weekly Photo Challenge had the same theme.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #54: Detail

As I mentioned last week in my review of the novel The Pillars of the Earth, the late Gothic period in Spain transitioned into a very ornate style of architecture called Plateresque.  The New Cathedral of Salamanca is one example of this style.

Salamanca’s New Cathedral, late Gothic

Up close, you can see the incredible detail of the facades.  “Plateresque” means “in the style of a silversmith,” so there are many little flourishes.

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There were some renovations of the exterior done in the 90s, and the builders added their own touches, including this astronaut.  See him on the left?  It is definitely an unexpected detail!

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You can find more details at the original Lens-Artist challenge.

Review: The Pillars of the Earth

As an elementary school student, I read a wonderful book called A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver and promptly fell in love with Eleanor of Aquitaine, the Middle Ages, and Abbot Suger’s idea that beautiful things could give glory to God.  In his case, “beautiful things” included the first church in the Gothic style at St. Denis in France in the 1140s.

Segovia Cathedral

I did not get to see Gothic cathedrals myself until many years later, when I first visited Europe as a university student.  I am still mad about them.  I have seen many Gothic churches in several countries (though my favorites are in Spain).

Salamanca’s New Cathedral, late Gothic

From my Spanish art history course, I learned about the architectural transitions from Romanesque to Gothic, then to Plateresque in the late Gothic period and on to the Renaissance.

Ciudad Rodrigo Cathedral, transitioning from Romanesque to Gothic

So it’s no surprise that I would love a novel about the building of a Gothic cathedral. But The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett is more than that. This behemoth has hidden depths, and it made its way onto the top 100 list for the Great American Read for a reason.

The novel works on several levels.  At its most basic, it is a family drama, chronicling the struggles and joys of life over several generations.  Tom the builder, his stepson Jack, the earl’s daughter Aliena, and the new earl William all deal with matters of life, love, and death, all watched over by Prior Philip.

The setting of a village in England in the 1100s adds another layer of historical fiction, with such details as how cloth was felted, what people ate and how they celebrated holidays, and the hierarchy in religious institutions like a priory.

Lastly, it fits neatly into the epic narrative of English history, weaving in connections to events of the civil war between Empress Matilda (Maud) and her cousin Stephen, the ascension of Henry II and the murder of Thomas Beckett.

Sevilla Cathedral

The cathedral itself is particularly interesting.  Each architectural element of the Gothic style is developed and explained organically as the story progresses: the pointed arches, ribbed vaults, flying buttresses, and stained glass windows.

Pillars is inspiring not just because it shows a beautiful creation dedicated to God but because it also shows that here on Earth justice is possible and worth fighting for, whether it is the result of a curse by a “witch,” meted out by bishop or king, or at the hands of the mob/public opinion.  Though the Catholic Church obviously features prominently, it is not an overly religious book.  Also, the supernatural and the divine are presented as two sides of the same coin, which feels natural to the time period.

Aix Cathedral, Aix-en-Provence, France

Follett’s prose not the best I’ve read, but the twists of the story held my attention and surprised me.  I was surprised how invested I got in the details of the story and how all the events stayed with me. I know somebody is going to have problems with the two main female characters, but I liked them both.  I’m looking forward to reading the sequels which take place in the same area, jumping ahead several generations.

Nave of the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, modernisme style based in Gothic. Yes, this blog post was just an excuse to post all my pictures of churches.

Lens-Artists Challenge #53 – Imagination with Friends in Lisboa

Congrats to the Lens-Artists Challenge for a great first year!  I’ve been participating since last November and have really enjoyed it.  We have a special topic this week in honor of the anniversary, bloggers’ choice.  See below to check out what the founders of the challenge picked.

 

I tried to incorporate all their themes in my collection of photos.  During university, I studied abroad in Spain for a semester with a group of about a dozen others.  There were eight of us girls that often took weekend trips, including one to the beautiful capital of Portugal, Lisboa.

I wonder what she is imagining?

We were able to see several parts of the city, including Belém and the Park of Nations area that was created for the ’98 World Expo.

The Expo theme was The Oceans

There was so much beautiful architecture, great food, and wonderful outdoor spaces in the city.  Though we went not knowing a word of Portuguese, we managed to muddle through with a mix of English and Spanish.  We found the people to be very friendly, speaking of making connections. 😀

 

I would love to travel to Lisboa again someday!  I also haven’t seen these friends in many years now, so it was wonderful to look back at these happy memories.  Here’s to another year of great photos!

 

Friendship (Tina)

 A Country That’s Special to You (Ann-Christine)

 Imagination (Patti)

Connected (Amy)